German Studies | Literatures, Cultures, and Languages

 

languages literatures and cultures

Languages, literatures, and cultures are also excellent foundations for students interested in pursuing careers that do not require post-graduate education, for example, in government, publishing, tourism, and business, any field in which intelligence, communication skills, and a broad liberal education are valued. Languages, Literatures, & Cultures (LLC) majors engage in cross-cultural scholarship, teaching, and service within diverse local and global connections. The degree emphasizes an understanding of languages, literatures, and cultures within the context of a liberal arts education; and connecting with individuals and communities locally and abroad. Languages, Literatures and Cultures Our part-time faculty share office space on a revolving schedule. Please check the posted schedule outside of the following room locations to determine when you may meet with your instructor.


Classical and Modern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures < Wayne State


This Department offers courses and programs of instruction in fourteen different languages. In addition to language learning and Global Studies, the Department focuses on the cultures and literatures of ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the modern world, in courses taught both in languages indigenous to these regions as well as in English translation.

The study of other languages, literatures, and cultures not only provides important perspectives on the world, but also sharpens analytical and reasoning skills, deepens understanding of English, and enhances the quality of one's writing. Linguistic and broadly-based cultural studies provide excellent grounding for various professional programs, including law, business, medicine or health sciences, teaching at the high school or university level, library and information science, and museum practice.

Languages, literatures, and cultures are also excellent foundations for students interested in pursuing careers that do not require post-graduate education, for example, in government, publishing, tourism, and business, any field in which intelligence, communication skills, and a broad liberal education are valued.

The Department offers programs in both major and minor concentration as well as cognate course work that can provide perspectives for majors in other departments. A student who wishes to major or minor in one of our degree programs should meet with a Departmental advisor as soon as possible after entering the University.

University of Connecticut; M. Cooley Law School; M. Universidad de Grenada; Associate Professor. Offered Every Term. Continuation of grammar, readings in classical and modern prose. Offered Winter. Introduces learners of Arabic to language functions associated with business and travel. Communication for immediate use; emphasis on educated spoken Arabic. Situational dialogues built around units to address topics related to business such as job interview, airplane ticket purchase, and the like. Third year Arabic language course: advanced Arabic grammar, languages literatures and cultures, complexities of sentence construction in various styles literary, political, and scientific texts; written media; business correspondence.

Offered Fall, Winter. Introduction to authentic spoken Arabic. Language of everyday life; phonology and script. Communication for immediate use. Offered Fall. Functional usage of language and communication in context. Languages literatures and cultures essays written about topics discussed in class to improve writing skills.

Readings, periodic reports and consultations. Reading and translation of Arabic Medieval texts. Literature, language, religion languages literatures and cultures biography.

Offered Yearly. Language pertinent to media communications: written, visual and audio material. Background in origin and development of journalism in the Arab world, languages literatures and cultures. Current major newspapers and magazines used as basic reading materials. Theoretical and conceptual framework of second language learning.

From pre-Islamic period Jahiliya to the downfall of the Umayad dynasty in Andalusia Literature and culture of Arab Nahda period Renaissance beginning in nineteenth centurydown to the present. Fiction, languages literatures and cultures, biography, poetry. Course is offered in both Arabic and English. Arabic dialectology; Arabic as a minority language in contact. Theories and techniques developed outside Arabic, and their applicability to Arabic situations. Survey of historical constitution and theoretical structure of Arabic.

Structures and functions of the language of the Quran. It introduces linguistic, languages literatures and cultures, textual, cultural, and aesthetic aspects of this language from the perspective of medieval and modern scholars of Arabic.

Restriction s : Enrollment is limited to Graduate or Undergraduate level students. Students develop a medical Arabic lexicon through conversation, dialogues, role playing, mock medical situations, and writing medical reports. Readings; periodic consultations and reports. History of the evolution of Arabic. From antiquity to the s; emphasis on political, economic, social, and cultural developments in China, Japan, and Korea, and the nature and impact of their interactions.

Offered Intermittently. From beginning of nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, social and economic developments in China, Japan and Korea. Survey of Japanese languages literatures and cultures taught in English, languages literatures and cultures.

Also, survival language practice. Why some of them have undergone democratization and others have not; how political factors have affected their recent economic performance; what explains conflicts and cooperation among them, and what security implications they hold for the United States.

Offered Every Other Year. Restriction s : Enrollment is limited to Undergraduate level students. Explores the history of Japanese pop culture and its global spread, with both an emphasis on historical influences, intended messages, and appeal in Japan and around the world, and examination of manga, anime, video games, sports, fashion, literature, music, film, and food. Special topics in Asian Studies language, literature, languages literatures and cultures culture.

From early s to the present; political, economic, and social changes. Japanese history from its mythical origins to early nineteenth century; political, economic, social, cultural developments. Japanese history from the early nineteenth century to the present; emphasis on political, economic, and social developments. History of gender in China, Languages literatures and cultures, and Korea, with topics to include Confucianism, the state's role in gender construction, nationalism, imperialism, marriage, family, labor, sexuality, and feminism.

Disciplined writing assignments under the direction of a faculty member. Must be selected in conjunction with a designated corequisite. Required for all majors. Conversational Languages literatures and cultures, Chinese culture and customs, everyday Chinese street signs and symbols essential to travel and business in China. Offered for undergraduate credit only. Experiential learning course; participation in Chinese cultural events and supplemental Chinese language sessions. Students comment on a minimum of eight approved events via a discussion board, attend language sessions, and present a final project.

Introduction to the written and spoken forms of Chinese. Students will have the hands-on experience of learning Chinese sounds and tones with the intensive instruction and correction of the instructor. After studying the articulatory mechanisms for the Chinese phonetic inventory and system in theory, students will practice them in different combinations and contexts with that native accuracy as the target.

The most difficult part of Chinese learning is character writing. Basic stroke orders, intermediate literacy level. Art of Chinese calligraphy. Introduction to Chinese culture, society, and politics. The study of Chinese mythical and supernatural literature from the late Zhou through the Qing dynasties from around 10th century BCE to 18th century CE ; the cultural functions of myth and the supernatural as they relate to nation, ethnic identities, social and political structures, as well as religious and philosophical ideals.

Taught in English. Introduction to Chinese pop culture: values, functions, and changes. Genres and traditions of Chinese literature; influence on China of today. Directed study tailored to student and faculty interests and specializations. Basic knowledge of business Chinese; basic abilities of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and translating in business Chinese.

Writing, sound and grammar systems of Chinese; interaction between Chinese language and Chinese society. Introduction to major language families in Asia; grammar, sounds, language contacts.

Chinese grammar from perspectives of negation, question formation, aspects and different parts of speech, and the like. Introduction to basic teaching grammar and sound rules and general teaching methodology.

Survey of the culture and civilization of Ancient Greece and Rome, in particular those aspects that laid the political, social, and cultural framework of the modern world. Vocabulary-building course designed to enlarge English vocabulary and increase understanding and spelling proficiency through a study of Greek and Latin roots of English words; aspects of interpreting and remembering legal, medical, and scientific vocabularies included.

Typical myths related to religion, custom, ethics, philosophy, languages literatures and cultures, art, literature. Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. The origin and development of Greek tragedy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas. Dramatic and literary qualities of representative plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence. Origins and development of Greek Comedy related to the enduring quality and contemporary relevance of these dramas and their influence on later literature.

Cleopatra as a figure of history and of myth, using sources ranging from ancient texts to contemporary websites, languages literatures and cultures, literature, history, art and film. Use of methodologies that classicists employ to focus on this single aspect of the ancient languages literatures and cultures study of a historical problem that is plagued with biases.

Ancient sources about Medea; her presence in work of four African American authors: W. Topics on roles of women and views of gender and sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome, drawn from fields such as literature, art, drama, and law. Origin and uses of coined money in the Greco-Roman world; economic, social, languages literatures and cultures, political, cultural impact of coinage on Greek and Languages literatures and cultures civilization from the Sixth Century B.

A historical survey of the cultural, social, and literary world of early Christianity. Survey of Byzantine culture, religion, society, and literature from late Antiquity tolanguages literatures and cultures secondary and primary sources in translation.

Interdisciplinary approach to the most important period of Roman history: the beginning of The Roman Empire under Augustus; history, politics, literature, languages literatures and cultures, art.

Explores what it meant to be Greek from Archaic Languages literatures and cultures to the modern era.

 

Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages | Stanford University

 

languages literatures and cultures

 

Dept. of Languages, Literatures and Cultures; C Clark Building; Fort Collins, CO ; Phone: ; Fax: Languages, Literatures, & Cultures (LLC) majors engage in cross-cultural scholarship, teaching, and service within diverse local and global connections. The degree emphasizes an understanding of languages, literatures, and cultures within the context of a liberal arts education; and connecting with individuals and communities locally and abroad. Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; Not all courses are offered every semester. Refer to the schedule of courses for each term's specific offerings. More Info. Courses at the University of Florida, with the exception of specific foreign language courses and courses in the online Master of Arts in Mass Communication program, are taught in.